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State Normal School 
salem massachusetts 





SIXTY-FIRST YEAR 

1914-191? 



' '- . ■ ' ' ' ' 



State Normal School 
salem massachusetts 




SIXTY-FIRST YEAR 
1914-191? 



Approved by 
The State Board op Publication. 



Board of Education 



Members term expires 

FREDERICK P. FISH, Chairman, 84 State Street, Boston . . 1916 

Miss SARAH LOUISE ARNOLD, 9 Crescent Avenue, Newton Center 1915 
JEREMIAH E. BURKE, School Committee Rooms, Mason Street, 

Boston 1917 

Mrs. ELLA LYMAN CABOT, 1 Marlborough Street, Boston . . 1916 

SIMEON B. CHASE, Fall River 1915 

THOMAS B. FITZPATRICK, 104 Kingston Street, Boston . . 1917 

FREDERICK W. HAMILTON, 95 Avon Hill Street, Cambridge . 1916 

PAUL H. HANUS, Harvard University, Cambridge . . . 1917 

CLINTON Q. RICHMOND, North Adams 1915 



Officers 

(Address: Ford Building, Boston) 



DAVID SNEDDEN 
WILLIAM ORR . 
ROBERT O. SMALL 
CHARLES R. ALLEN 
RUFUS W. STIMSON 
CLARENCE D. KINGSLEY 
WALTER I. HAMILTON 
FRANCIS G. WADSWORTH 
CHESTER L. PEPPER . 
EDWARD C. BALDWIN 



Commissioner 

Deputy Commissioner 

Deputy Commissioner 

Agent 

Agent 

Agent 

Agent 

Agent 

Agent 

Business Agent 



Instructors 



The Normal School 



Harriet Laura Martin 
Jessie Putnam Learoyd 
Charles Frederick Whitney 
Mary Alice Warren . 
Gertrude Brown Goldsmith, A.B 
Helen Hood Rogers . 
Fred Willis Archibald 
Harriet Emma Peet . 
Louise Caroline Wellman 



JOSEPH ASBURY PITMAN Principal 

Pedagogy- 
Librarian. Library practice 
. English 
Practical arts and fine arts 
Physical training, physiology and hygiene 
, M.A. Nature study, gardening, psychology 
Children's literature, reading 
Music 
Literature, arithmetic 
Secretary 

Sumner Webster Cushing, S.B., A.M. Geography, geography of commerce, 

industrial geography, commercial literature 
Charles Elmer Doner ....... Penmanship 

Ethel Almira Morse, B.A. . Typewriting, correspondence, shorthand 

Genorie Palmer Solomon . . Assistant, manual arts and geography 

Alexander Hugh Sproul, B.S., M.S. Bookkeeping, commercial law, econom- 
ics, history of commerce, pedagogy 
Ethel Augusta Rollinson Shorthand, bookkeeping, commercial arithmetic 



Laura Turner Cooper, B.A., M.A. 
Carrie Beryl Johnson 
Lyman Richards Allen, S.B. 
Walter George Whitman, A.B., A.M 



History and social science 

Assistant, arithmetic and reading 

Psychology 

Practical science 

. Assistant, English and history 



The Training School 

Lyman Richards Allen, S.B. 



Clarence Stoddard Goldsmith . 

Practical arts 
Amalie Knobel ..... 
Bertha Mayo Arey .... 
May Lillian Perham 
Mary Elizabeth James 
Gertrude Isabel Bigelow 
Kathryn Marie Donovan 
Edith Marion Childs 



. Director 
Assistant to the director 



. ■ . . Grade 8 

. . . Grades 7 and 6 

Grades 5 and 4 

Grades 3 and 2 

Grade 1 and kindergarten 

Kindergartner and assistant in primary grades 

Household arts ; assistant in intermediate grades 



The Farms School, Marblehead 



Editha May Grant 



Ungraded 



Officers 



Officers of the Salem Normal Association, 1913-1916 

Mrs. Fanny Fern Andrews, Boston (Class LVII.) . President 

Mrs. Alice Gates Osborn, Peabody (Class LXXII.) . Vice-President 
Mrs. Lydia Richards Burnham, Beverly (Class 
LXXXVIII.) 



Miss Florence M. Davidson, Salem (Class XCIV.) 

Mr. Warren W. Oliver, Newton (Class XCVI.) 

Mrs. Lizzie F. Hood, Danvers (Class LIII.) . 

Miss Martha P. Ober, Salem (Class XLVII.) 

Mrs. Nellie Kelman Greenough, Maiden (Class 

XXXVII.) 

Mrs. Mary Chandler Harrington, Peabody (Class L.) 
Mrs. Fanny Sargent Endicott, Chelsea (Class LIV.) . 



Secretary 
Assistant Secretary 
Treasurer 



Directors 



Officers of the Senior Class 

Charlotte M. Macadam ...... President 

Marion E. Patriquin ...... Vice-President 

Ruth F. Hlatt ........ Secretary 

Anna A. Lowe ........ Treasurer 



Members of the School Council 



J. Asbury Pitman 
Laura T. Cooper 
Genorie P. Solomon . 
Elsa L. Bassett 
Viola Waitt 
Charlotte M. Macadam 
Edith M. Kent . 
John C. Ronan . 
Joanna T. Daly 



1 • 

> Faculty 

> Senior Class 



• J 



Junior Class 



Members of the Athletic Advisory Board 

J. Asbury Pitman . . . . . . . \ 



Alexander H. Sproul 
Timothy J. Driscoll 
Andreas W. S. Turner 
Arthur J. Sullivan . 






Faculty 



> Students 
Graduate 



8 



Officers of the Athletic Association 

C. Philip O'Rourke ...... President 

Andreas W. S. Turner ..... Vice-President 

Gilbert W. Turner ...... Secretary 

Alexander H. Sproul ...... Treasurer 



Officers of the Art Club 

C. Frederick Whitney ..... President 

Genorie P. Solomon ...... Vice-President 

Helen Learoyd ....... Secretary and Treasurer 

Officers of the Musical Clubs 

Glee Club 

Elizabeth Winchester ..... Secretary 

Helen N. O'Connor ...... Treasurer 

Elsa L. Bassett ....... Librarian 

Orchestra 
Hazel D. Shields . . . . . . Secretary and Treasurer 



Calendar for 1915=1916 



Spring Recess 

From close of school on Friday, February 26, 1915, to Monday, March 8, 1915, 

at 9.30 a.m. 
From close of school on Friday, April 30, 1915, to Monday, May 10, 1915, 

at 9.30 a.m. 

Graduation Week, 1915 

Saturday afternoon and evening, June 19, the class play 
Tuesday morning, June 22, at 10.30 o'clock, graduation 
Tuesday evening, June 22, reception of the graduating class 
Wednesday evening, June 23, the class banquet 

Beginning of School Year 

Thursday, September 9, 1915, at 9.30 a.m. 

Thanksgiving Recess 

From Wednesday, 12.30 p.m., preceding Thanksgiving Day, to the following 

Tuesday, at 9.30 a.m. 

Christmas Recess 

From 3 p.m. on Thursday, December 23, 1915, to Monday, January 3, 1916, 

at 9.30 a.m. 

Beginning of Second Half Year 

Monday, January 31, 1916 

Spring Recess 

From close of school on Friday, February 25, 1916, to Monday, March 6, 1916, 

at 9.30 a.m. 
From close of school on Friday, April 28, 1916, to Monday, May 8, 1916, at 

9.30 a.m. 

Graduation 

Tuesday, June 20, 1916, at 10.30 a.m. 



10 
Entrance Examinations 

1915 

Thursday and Friday, June 24 and 25 
Tuesday and Wednesday, September 7 and 8 

1916 

Thursday and Friday, June 22 and 23 
Tuesday and Wednesday, September 5 and 6 

(For hours and order, see pages 15 and 1G) 



Note. — The daily sessions of the school are from 9.30 to 12.35 and from 1.35 to 3 o'clock. 
The regular weekly holiday of both the normal and the training school is on Saturday. 
The telephone call of the normal school is Salem, 375; of the training school, Salem, 344. 
The principal's residence is at 260 Lafayette Street, and his telephone call is Salem, 943. 



State Norhal School 

SALEH, flASSACHUSETTS 



AIMS AND PURPOSES 

The aim of the school is distinctly professional. Normal 
schools are maintained by the State in order that the children 
in the public schools of the Commonwealth may have teachers 
of superior ability; therefore no student may be admitted to 
or retained in the school who does not give reasonable promise 
of developing into an efficient teacher. 

The school offers as thorough a course of academic instruc- 
tion as time permits and the claims of professional training de- 
mand. The subjects of the elementary curriculum are care- 
fully reviewed with reference to methods of teaching. The 
professional training also includes the study of physiology and 
of psychology from a professional standpoint; the principles of 
education upon which all good teaching is founded; observa- 
tion and practice in the application of these principles; and a 
practical study of children, under careful direction. In all the 
work of the school there is a constant and persistent effort to 
develop a true professional spirit, to reveal to the student the 
wealth of opportunity which is open to the teacher, and the 
grandeur of a life of service. 

APPLICATION FOR ADMISSION 

It is advisable that application be made soon after January 
1, and that certificates be forwarded earlv in June. As far as 
possible, examinations should be taken in June. 



12 



REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION 

The admission requirements as given below will be in effect 
after January 1, 1916. For 1915 the admission requirements 
will be the same as for 1914. 

I. A candidate for admission to a Massachusetts State 
normal school as a regular student must have attained the age 
of seventeen years if a man, and sixteen years if a woman, on 
or before the first day of September in the year in which he 
seeks admission (but for admission to the household arts 
course at the Framingham Normal School an age of at least 
eighteen years is required); must be free from diseases or in- 
firmities or other defects which would unfit him for the office 
of teacher; must present a certificate of good moral character; 
and must present evidence of graduation from a high school 
or of equivalent preparation, and, in addition, offer such 
satisfactory evidence of scholarship as may be required by the 
regulations of the Board. He must submit detailed records 
of scholarship from the principal of the high school or other 
school in which preparation has been made, showing the 
amount of time given to individual subjects and the grades 
therein, and such additional evidence of qualifications for the 
calling of teacher as may be defined in the regulations of the 
Board relating to normal schools. 

II. A candidate for admission as a regular student to a 
general course must offer satisfactory evidence of preparation 
in the subjects listed under "A," "B" and "C," amounting 
to 15 units, 10 of which units, however, must be in subjects 
under "A" and "B" and secured either by examination or 
certification. (The Massachusetts Normal Art School requires, 
in addition, that a special examination in drawing be passed. 
Applicants for admission to the Practical Arts Department of 
the Fitchburg Normal School may substitute evidence of 
practical experience in some industrial employment in whole 
or in part for the above.) 

A unit represents a year's study in any subject in a second- 
ary school, constituting approximately one-quarter of a full 
year's work. 



13 



A. Prescribed Subjects. — Three units. 
(1) English literature and composition . 



3 units 



B. Elective * 


Subjects. — At least 7 units from the following 


subjects: — 


(2) Algebra ........ 1 unit 


(3) Geometry 




. 








1 unit 


(4) History 




. 








1, 2 or 3 units 


(5) Latin . 












2, 3 or 4 units 


(6) French 












2 or 3 units 


(7) German 




^ ■ 








2 or 3 units 


(8) Physics 




. 








1 unit 


(9) Chemistry 












1 unit 


(10) Biology, botany or zoology 








| or 1 unit 


(11) Physical geography 








§ or 1 unit 


(12) Physiology and hygiene 








| or 1 unit 


(13) General science 








\ or 1 unit 


(14) Drawing .... 








\ or 1 unit 


(15) Household arts 








1 or 2 units 


(16) Manual training . 








1 unit 


(17) Stenography, including typewriting 








1 or 2 units 


(18) Bookkeeping 








1 unit 


(19) Commercial geography . 








\ or 1 unit 


(20) Arithmetic 




. 








. \ or 1 unit 



For the present, the topics included within the foregoing 
subjects will be such as are usually accepted by the Massa- 
chusetts colleges for entrance. The outlines submitted by the 
College Entrance Examination Board (substation 84, New 
York City) will be found suggestive by high schools. 

C. Additional Subjects. — At least 5 units from any of the 
foregoing subjects, or from other subjects approved by the 
high school towards the diploma of graduation of the applicant 
representing work in addition to that for which credit is gained 
by examination or certification. 

III. A. Examinations. — Each applicant for admission, 
unless exempted by the provisions of sections IV. and V., 
must pass entrance examinations in the subjects as required 
under "A" and "B." Examinations in these subjects will be 
held at each of the normal schools in June and September of 
each year (examinations for the Massachusetts Normal Art 
School are held only in September). Candidates applying for 



14 

admission by examination must present credentials or certifi- 
cates from their schools to cover the requirements under "C," 
and will not be given examinations in these subjects. Persons 
not able to present these credentials must obtain credit for 
15 units by examination in the subjects listed under "A" 
and "B." 

B. Division of Examinations. — A candidate for admission 
to a normal school may take all of the examinations at once, 
or divide them between June and September. A candidate 
will receive permanent credit for any units secured by ex- 
amination or certification. 

IV. Admission on Certificate. — A graduate of a public 
high school approved by the Board of Education for purposes 
of certification to a State normal school may be exempted by 
the principal of the normal school from examination in any of 
the subjects under "A" and "B" in which the principal of 
the high school shall certify that the applicant is entitled to 
certification, in accordance with standards as defined by the 
Board of Education. 

Credits secured by any candidate from the Board of Regents 
of the State of New York, or for admission to any college in 
the New England College Entrance Certificate Board, either 
by examination or certification, or in the examinations of the 
College Entrance Examination Board, will be accepted towards 
the total of 10 units under "A" and "B." In addition 
to the units granted by certification candidates must present 
credentials for subjects under " C." 

V. Admission of Special Students. — (a) When in any 
normal school, or in any course therein, the number of students 
entered as regular students and as advanced students at the 
opening of any school year is below the maximum number for 
which the school has accommodations, the commissioner may 
authorize the admission as a special student of an applicant 
who, being otherwise qualified, and who, having taken the 
entrance examinations, has failed to meet the full requirements 
provided in the regulations of the Board, but who, neverthe- 
less, is recommended by the principal of the normal school as, 
in his estimation, qualified to become a teacher. Such a 



15 

special student shall be given regular standing only when he 
shall have satisfied all admission requirements, and when his 
work in the school, in the estimation of the principal, justifies 
such standing. The principal of the normal school shall 
report annually in October to the commissioner as to all 
special students. Certificates may be granted to special 
students in accordance with regulations approved by the 
Board. 

(b) When in any normal school, or in any course therein, 
the number of students entered as regular students, as ad- 
vanced students and as special students as defined in (a) at 
the opening of any school year is below the maximum number 
for which the school has accommodations, the commissioner 
may, subject to such special regulations as may be approved 
by the Board, authorize the admission to any class as a 
special student, on the recommendation of the principal, of a 
person possessing special or exceptional qualifications for the 
work of such class. Such special student shall not be con- 
sidered a candidate for a diploma until he shall have qualified 
as a regular student, but may, on the satisfactory completion 
of the work of the course, be granted a certificate to that 
effect by the Board. The principal of the normal school shall 
report annually in October to the commissioner as to all 
special students in the school under the provisions of this 
section. 

VI. Admission as Advanced Students. — A graduate of a 
normal school or of a college, or any person with not less than 
three years' satisfactory experience in teaching, may be ad- 
mitted as a regular or as an advanced student to any course 
under such regulations as may be approved by the Board. 

SCHEDULE OF ENTRANCE EXAMINATIONS 

Thursday, June 24, 1915 



- 


Morning 




Afternoon 


8.30- 8.45 


Registration 


1.30-2.30 


Geometry 


8.45-10.30 


English literature and 


2.30-4.00 


Latin, arithmetic 




composition 


4.00-5.00 


General science 


10.30-11.30 


History 






11.30-12.30 


Algebra 







16 



Friday, June 25, 1915 



8.15- 8.30 
8.30- 9.30 
9.30-11.00 

11.00-12.00 



Morning 

Registration 
Drawing, stenography 
French, German, Cur- 
rent events 
Physical geography, 
commercial geography 



Afternoon 

1.30-2.30 Chemistry, physics 
2.30-3.30 Physiology, bookkeeping 
3.30-4.30 Biology, botany, zool- 
ogy 
4.30-5.30 Household arts or man- 
ual training 



Tuesday, September 7, 1915 



8.30- 8.45 
8.45-10.30 

10.30-11.30 
11.30-12.30 



Morning 

Registration 

English literature and 

composition 

History 

Algebra 



1.30-2.30 
2.30-4.00 
4.00-5.00 



Afternoon 

Geometry 
Latin, arithmetic 
General science 



Wednesday, September 8, 1915 



8.15- 8.30 
8.30- 9.30 
9.30-11.00 

11.00-12.00 



Morning 

Registration 
Drawing, stenography 
French, German, cur- 
rent events 
Physical geography, 
commercial geography 



Afternoon 

1.30-2.30 Chemistry, physics 
2.30-3.30 Physiology, bookkeeping 
3.30-4.30 Biology, botany, zool- 
ogy 
4.30-5.30 Household arts or man- 
ual training 



REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION TO THE COMMERCIAL 

DEPARTMENT 

The requirements for admission to the prescribed course of 
four years are the same as for students who apply for ad- 
mission to the elementary department. 

Graduates of colleges, and graduates of normal schools who 
have had at least two years of satisfactory experience in 
teaching, may be admitted to special elective courses of one 
year. 

Graduates of normal schools who have had no experience in 
teaching, graduates of private commercial schools who present 
either diplomas from approved high schools or the equivalent, 
and who have had at least one year's experience in teaching 



17 



or in business, and other persons presenting evidence of proper 
fitness and at least two years of satisfactory experience in 
teaching or in business, may be admitted to special elective 
courses of two years. 

Graduates from the full course will receive diplomas. Ap- 
propriate certificates will be awarded to special students who 
complete approved courses of study. Students who present 
full equivalents of prescribed courses may be admitted to 
advanced standing. 

CONDITIONS OF GRADUATION 

The satisfactory accomplishment of the academic work of 
the course does not constitute a complete title to the diploma 
of the school. The power of the student to teach — judged 
from his personality and his efficiency in practice teaching — 
is so important that one who is manifestly unable to do so will 
not be graduated, whatever his academic standing may be. 

THE OBSERVATION AND TRAINING DEPARTMENT 

The Commercial Department. — The necessary opportunity 
for observation and practice teaching for students in this 
department is afforded in, the Gloucester High School, the 
Lynn English High School, the Newton Technical High School, 
the Washington Grammar School, Beverly, and the Salem 
Commercial School. 

Business practice is obtained in the offices of several im- 
portant firms and banks in Boston and Salem. 

The Elementary and the Intermediate Departments. — In co- 
operation with the school committee of the city of Salem, the 
normal school maintains a training school, beginning with a 
kindergarten and fitting pupils for the high school. The train- 
ing school is conducted in a new building especially designed 
for its purpose. Besides thirty classrooms it contains an 
assembly hall, a library and rooms for woodworking, printing, 
bookbinding and household arts. 

In planning the instruction in this school the aim is to 
connect it as closely as possible with the work in the normal 



18 

school, to the end that the methods of teaching here may 
exemplify the theory which the normal school students are 
taught. A large part of the instruction in the training school 
is either supervised or actually given by normal school 
teachers, and the work in the normal school in particular 
subjects, as well as in the theory of education, is based largely 
on directed observation in the training department. 

The work of the supervising teachers in the training depart- 
ment includes responsibility for the progress and discipline of 
pupils and the continuity and efficiency of the lesson prepara- 
tion and classroom instruction of the student teachers, subject 
to the general direction and advice of the director of the 
school. 

Opportunity is provided for students who intend to teach 
in the first grade to observe in the kindergarten, in order 
that they may become familiar with the theory and methods 
of the kindergarten and its relations to the rest of the ele- 
mentary school system. All students who wish it have the 
opportunity to teach in our model ungraded school in Marble- 
head. Arrangements have been made, also, for the seniors to 
gain a considerable amount of experience in teaching in the 
schools of Beverly, Newton and Salem. 



19 



CURRICULA FOR ELEMENTARY, INTERMEDIATE, AND 
COMMERCIAL DEPARTMENTS 

A. Elementary Department 

Designed primarily for students preparing to teach in first six grades of elementary schools 

A period is forty minutes in length 





Number of 
Weeks 


Periods Weekly of — 


Name and Number of 
Course 


Recitation 


Laboratory 

or 

Teaching 


Outside 
Preparation 


First Year 










English Language 1 . . 


36 


2 


- • 


2 to 3 hours 


English Language 8 . 


36 


1 


- 


1 hour 


English Language 9 . 


36 


2 


- 


V/l hours 


Literature 1 .... 


36 


2 


- 


2 l A hours 


Arithmetic 1 


36 


3 


- 


2 to 3 hours 


Geography 1 

History and Social Science 1 


36 
36 


4 
2 


Occasional 
field trips 


4 hours 
2 hours 




36 


1 


- 


1 hour 




36 


1 


- 


None 


Education 1 .... 


36 


3 


- 


3 hours 


Library Study .... 


15 


1 


1 


1 hour 


Practical Arts 1 . 
Fine Arts 1 . . . 


} 36 


3 


- 


1 hour 


Physical Education 1 . 


36 


3 


- 


None 


Second Year 










English Language 2 . . . 


26 


2 


- 


2 hours 


Literature 2 .... 


26 


2 


- 


2 to 3 hours 


History and Social Science 2 


26 


2 


- 


2 hours 


Physical Education 4 . 


26 


2 


- 


2 hours 




26 


1 


- 


1 hour 




26 


1 


- 


None 


Education 2 .... 


26 


1 


- 


2 hours 


English Language 10 . 


26 


2 


- 


1 hour 


Nature Study .... 


26 


4 


- 


4 to 5 hours 


Practical Science 1 . . . 


26 


2 


- 


2 hours 


Practical Arts 2 . 


} 26 


2 


- 


2 hours 


Physical Education 2 . 


26 


3 


_ 


None 


Education 6 


10 


Entire time 


- 


- 



20 



B. Intermediate Department 

Designed for students preparing to teach in grades 7, 8 and 9 





Number of 
Weeks 


Periods Weekly of — 


Name and Number of 
Course 


Recitation 


Laboratory 

or 

Teaching 


Outside 
Preparation 


First Year 










Identical with first year of A 










Second Year 










English Language 3 . 


26 


2 


- 


2 to 3 hours 


Literature 2 .... 


26 


2 


- 


2 to 3 hours 


Arithmetic 2 


26 


3 


- - 


3 to 4 hours 


Geography 2 

History and Social Science 3 


26 
26 


3 

2 


Occasional 
field trips 


3 hours 
2 hours 




26 


1 


- 


1 hour 




26 


1 


- 


None 


Practical Science 1 


26 


2 


- 


2 hours 


English Language 11 . 


26 


2 


- 


1 hour 


Practical Arts 3 . 


l 26 


2 


_ 


2 hours 




J 








Physical Education 3 . 


26 


3 


- 


None 


Education 7 


10 


Entire time 


— 


— 


Third Year 










English Language 4 

Literature 3 .... 


26 
26 


2 
2 


3 


None 

2 to 3 hours 


Geography 3 


26 


4 


- 


6 hours 


Practical Science 4 


26 


4 


- 


4 hours 


History and Social Science 4 


26 


4 


- 


4 hours 


Practical Arts 4 . ... 


\ 26 


4 


_ 


2 hours 


Fine Arts 4 


1 








Education 3 .... 


26 


4 


- 


4 hours 


Physical Education 5 . 

Music 4 


26 
26 


2 
1 


- 


2 hours 
None 


Education 7 


10 


Entire time 







21 



C. Commercial Department 

Designed for students preparing to teach in high schools of commerce or commercial depart- 
ments in high schools 





Number of 
Weeks 


Periods Weekly 


OF — 


Name and Number of 
Course 


Recitation 


Laboratory 

or 

Teaching 


Outside 
Preparation 


First Year 










English Language 5 . . 


36 


2 


- 


2 hours 


Shorthand 1 


36 


4 


- 


5 hours 


Typewriting 1 


36 


5 


- 


None 


History and Social Science 5 


36 


2 


- 


2 hours 


Geography 4 


36 


2 


- 


2 hours 


Practical Science 5 


36 


2 


- 


2 hours 


Bookkeeping 1 


36 


2 


- 


3 hours 


Bookkeeping la . 


36 


1 


- 


IK hours 


English Language 12 . 


36 


1 


- 


1 hour 


Physical Education 6 . 


36 


1 


- 


V/i hours 


Music 4 


36 


1 


- 


None 


Second Year 










English Language 6 
English Language 7 . 


36 
36 


2 

1 


Frequent 
conference 


2 to 3 hours 
\ x /i hours 


Shorthand 2 


36 


3 


- 


4 hours 


Typewriting 2 


36 


3 


- 


Yl hour 


History and Social Science 6 


36 


3 


- 


3 hours 


Arithmetic 3 


36 


2 


- 


3 hours 


Geography 5 


36 


2 


- 


3 hours 


Bookkeeping 2 


36 


3 


- 


4^ hours 


Education 4 


36 


3 


- 


3 to 4 hours 


English Language 13 . 


36 


1 


- 


1 hour 


Music 4 


36 


1 


- 


None 


Third Year 










Business practice under the gen- 
eral supervision of the school 











22 



Commercial Department — Concluded. 









Number of 
Weeks 


Periods Weekly of — 


Name and Number op 
Course 


Recitation 


Laboratory 

or 

Teaching 


Outside 
Preparation 


Fourth Year 
Literature 5 
Literature 6 
Shorthand 3 
Typewriting 3 
History and Social Science 
History and Social Science 
History and Social Science 
Geography 6 
English Language 14 . 
Bookkeeping 3 
Education 5 
Music 4 
Education 8 


9 

7 
8 




26 
26 
26 
26 
26 
13 
13 
26 
26 
26 
26 
26 
10 


2 
2 
3 
3 
2 
3 
3 
2 
1 
3 
2 
1 
Entire time 


_i 


2 to 3 hours 
2 hours 
4 hours 
2 hours 
V/2 hours 
4 hours 
4 hours 
2 hours 

1 hour 
4^ hours 

2 hours 
None 



1 An afternoon every third week for studying a local industry first hand 



Elective for One-year Special Course 





Number of 
Weeks 


Periods Weekly of — 


Name and Number of 
Course 


Recitation 


Laboratory 

or 

Teaching 


Outside 
Preparation 


Shorthand 4 
Shorthand 5 
Typewriting 4 
Bookkeeping 4 
Bookkeeping 4a . 


26 to 36 
26 to 36 
26 to 36 
26 to 36 
26 to 36 


5 
1 
5 
2 
2 


- 


8 hours 
IY2 hours 
2 to 3 hours 1 
2 hours 
2 hours 



1 Second half year 



23 

Courses for elementary school teachers are marked A; for 
intermediate school teachers, B; for commercial teachers, C. 

ENGLISH LANGUAGE 

English Language 1. (A, B.) Language lessons and composi- 
tion in the first six grades. Discussion, reading, written work, criticism, 
conference. Miss Learoyd and Miss . 

First year. Two recitations and two to three hours of preparation 
weekly. 

Individual training in clear and effective speech and writing; principles of 
language studied chiefly as a foundation for teaching; aims and methods in 
teaching English; type lessons. 

English Language 2. (A.) Teaching of English in the first six 
grades. Discussion, reading, written work, conference. Miss Learoyd. 
Second year. Two recitations and two hours of preparation weekly. 

Definite lesson plans for each grade, illustrating different lines of work; 
practice in adapting stories and other material for use in schools ; study of good 
language books and books on the teaching of English. 

English Language 3. (B.) Composition. Discussion, reading, 
themes, criticism, conference. Miss Learoyd. 

Second year. Two recitations and two to three hours of preparation 
weekly. 

Aim: to give systematic and advanced instruction in English and training 
in oral and written composition. Narration, description, exposition. 

English Language 4. (B.) Teaching of English in grades 7, 8 
and 9. Miss Learoyd. 

Third year. Two recitations and two to three laboratory periods weekly. 

Discussion of subject-matter and methods of training in use at present; 
selection and organization of material to accomplish definite aims; a systematic 
and typical course of lessons worked out for one of the upper grades. 

English Language 5. (C.) Rhetoric and composition. Themes, 
criticism, dictation, correction of papers, conference. Miss Learoyd. 
First year. Two recitations and two hours of preparation weekly. 

Study of the paragraph, the sentence (including grammar) ; words; the study 
of models; oral and written composition; spelling and definition; punctuation 
and capitalization. Aims: clear thinking and effective speech and writing. 



English Language 6. (C.) Exposition, description, narration. 
Miss Learoyd. 

Second year. Two recitations and two to three hours of preparation 
weekly, and frequent conferences. 

Collecting and organizing material and presenting it in oral or written form. 
Reading specimens of prose composition, short stories, magazines. Many short 



24 

and frequent long themes; training in securing and holding the attention of the 
class by reading aloud, giving abstracts of stories and of other reading, criticism, 
etc. Correct use and practice in dictation. Aims: clear, full and interesting 
presentation. 

English Language 7. (C.) Business English and correspond- 
ence. Miss Morse. 

Second year. One recitation and one and one-half hours of prepara- 
tion weekly. 

Aim: to give the student a thorough training in business letter-writing, as 
well as to acquaint him with the important details of office work. The work of 
the second half year is constructively critical in nature, and terminates with the 
strictly professional work of the course. 

English Language 8. (A, B.) Methods course in reading for 
teachers in the first six grades v . Miss Rogers. 

First year. One recitation and one hour of preparation or conference 
or observation lesson weekly. 

The "learning to read" stage, phonetics and the use of the dictionary are 

emphasized. 

» 

English Language 9. (A, B.) Oral reading. Miss Johnson. 
First year. Two recitations and one and one-half hours of preparation 

weekly. 

Aims: training in oral reading and in methods of teaching reading in grades 4, 
5 and 6. 

English Language 10. (A.) Practice and methods course in 
penmanship for teachers of the first six grades. Mr. Doner. 
Second year. Two recitations and one hour of preparation weekly. 

Aim: to train students to write well on paper and on the blackboard, in order 
that they may possess the skill required to teach penmanship in the first six 
grades. Demonstration lessons before classes are required which give the student 
confidence and ability to teach. Class discussion of the best methods for secur- 
ing maximum of results in the minimum of time. 

English Language 11. (B.) Practice and methods course in 
penmanship for teachers in grades 7 and 8. Mr. Doner. 

Second year. Two recitations and one hour of preparation weekly. 

Aims and methods as in Penmanship 1. 

English Language 12. (C.) Beginner's course in penmanship. 
Mr. Doner. 

First year. One recitation and one hour of preparation weekly. 

Aim: to develop letter-form and freedom of movement. 



25 

. English Language 13. (C.) Advanced course in penmanship to 
perfect form and control of movement. Mr. Doner. 

Second year. One recitation and one hour of preparation weekly. 

Training to write well on paper and on the blackboard. 

English Language 14. (C.) Methods course in penmanship for 
teachers in commercial departments of high schools and for super- 
visors of penmanship in the grades. Mr. Doner. 

Fourth year. One recitation and one hour of preparation weekly. 

Blackboard 'writing; pupils required to give demonstration lessons before 
class; class discussion of the best methods for securing results. 



LITERATURE 

Literature 1. (A, B.) Children's literature. Miss Rogers. 
First year. Two recitations and two and one-half hours of preparation 
weekly. 

Aims: acquaintance with and appreciation of subject-matter; its use in the 
first six grades of the elementary school. 

Literature 2. (A, B.) Appreciation of literature. Miss Peet. 
Second year. Two recitations and two to three hours of preparation 
weekly. 

The course covers the study of current magazines; a comparison of present- 
day and Victorian novels; a study of three great poets, including a contemporary 
one; a brief study of the modern drama. Each student chooses his own subject 
and writes during the year four long themes suggested by the main topics of 
the course. 

Literature 3. (B.) Teaching of literature in the seventh and 
eighth grades. Miss Peet. 

Third year. Two recitations, three conferences and two to three hours 
of preparation weekly. 

This course, which takes up methods of classroom work, embraces studies in 
poetry, in popular stories and standard books, together with the means of 
arousing in children an appreciation for literature and of cultivating in them 
the habit of reading good books. 

Literature 4. (C.) General literature. Miss Goldsmith. 
Fourth year. Two recitations and two to three hours of preparation 
weekly. Occasional papers. 

Aim: to arouse a keener appreciation and enjoyment of good literature. 
The various literary types are studied with their best representative authors, 



26 

and some attention is given to historical development. Works of authors of 
admitted superiority are used to establish a standard of comparison, and these 
are followed by a study of contemporary writers. 

Literature 5. (C.) Commercial literature. Mr. Cushing. 
Fourth year. Two recitations and two hours of preparation weekly. 

A study is made of the best of the current literature that deals with com- 
mercial and industrial conditions and activities! It is believed that some of the 
literature of this field is worthy of developing an appreciation for literature in 
general; at the same time it acquaints the student with the problems, ideals 
and significance of the wide field of commerce, in order that he may become a 
more intelligent high school teacher of commercial subjects. 



ARITHMETIC 

Arithmetic 1. (A, B.) Methods of teaching primary arithmetic. 

Miss Peet and Miss Johnson. 

First year. Three recitations and two to three hours of preparation 
weekly. 

This course takes up methods of teaching arithmetic to children in the first 
six grades of the elementary school. Such topics as the following are studied: 
aim of work; development of the idea of number; logical and psychological 
arrangement of subject-matter; outlining topics; preparation of lessons ; means 
of securing skill in computing; studies in application. 

Arithmetic 2. (B.) Methods of teaching arithmetic in the in- 
termediate school. Miss Peet. 

Second year. Three recitations and three to four hours of preparation 
weekly. 

This course consists of studies in business and industrial applications of 
arithmetic, and prepares students to teach in the seventh and eighth grades. 

Arithmetic 3. (C.) Commercial arithmetic, advanced course. 

Miss Rollinson. 

Second year. Two recitations and three hours of preparation weekly. 

The course is designed to give a review of elementary principles in arithmetic, 
the application of these principles to commercial work, and methods of handling 
the subject in high schools. 



LIBRARY STUDY 

Library study. (A, B.) A course in the technical knowledge 
and use of libraries. Miss Maetin. 

One-half of first year. One recitation, one laboratory or conference 
period and one hour of preparation weekly. 



27 

Aims: to bring students into close touch with the school library, show its 
resources and train to their efficient use ; to encourage observation and practice 
in the home public library; to develop and foster the right attitude towards 
books and libraries. Topics: decimal classification; arrangement on the library 
shelf; card catalogue; magazine index ; book index and table of contents; refer- 
ence books; investigation of a subject in a library; government publications; 
book selection and buying; the general principles of classification and cata- 
loguing; relations between the public library and the public school. 



GEOGRAPHY 

Geography 1. (A, B.) Mr. Cushing. 

First year. Four recitations, with regular field and laboratory work, 
and four hours of preparation weekly. 

First half year. General course, consisting of a study of soils, relief , weather, 
and climate in relation to people, in the vicinity of Salem and in distant lands. 
Aim : to develop a fund of geographic knowledge that will serve as a background 
for teaching earth sciences. 

Second half year. Methods course to prepare teachers for the first six grades. 
A study is made of the content of home geography, the plan of a course of study, 
methods of developing the subject-matter of geography in the successive grades, 
and the use of textbooks, collateral reading and illustrative material. 

Geography 2. (B.) Continental and commercial geography. 

Mr. Cushing. 

Second year. Three recitations and three hours of preparation weekly, 
with occasional field, commercial and industrial trips. 

Aim: to prepare teachers for the intermediate school. A study is made of 
North America, South America, Eurasia and home and world commercial 
geography. A wide range of treatment is suggested and discussed with refer- 
ence to the need and capacity of the pupil. Acquaintance is made with all of 
the modern textbooks, readers and manuals, and with other supplementary 
material. 

Geography 3. (B.) Advanced methods course in geography. 
Mr. Cushing. 

Third year. Four conferences, six hours of preparation and occasional 
teaching lessons in the training school. Prerequisites, Geography 1 and 
Geography 2. 

Aim: to fit students to become teachers of geography in the intermediate 
school. Problems of school geography are intensively considered. A study is 
made of life in type climatic and relief regions of the world, of selected problems 
in political and economic geography, of the geography of cities and of Massa- 
chusetts. Each student is required to teach a unit of the subject in at least four 
grades. 



28 

Geography 4. (C.) Physiography. Mr. Cushing. 
First year. Two recitations and two hours of preparation weekly; oc- 
casional field trips in fall and spring. 

Aim: to construct a broad basis for understanding commercial geography. 
A study is made of the origin and the significance of the earth's features, the 
agencies effecting changes in them, oceanography and climatology. The eco- 
nomic relation of each phase of the work is especially considered. 

Geography 5. (C.) Commercial geography. Mr. Cushing. 

Second year. Two recitations and two hours of preparation weekly; oc- 
casionally an afternoon for the study of actual commercial units, such as 
harbors, railroads and industrial plants. Prerequisite, Geography 4. 

An intensive study is made of the representative conditions and commodities 
ol commerce of Salem, Boston and vicinity, with special emphasis upon their 
relation to geographic factors. With this as a basis, world commerce is studied 
with the help of numerous textbooks, general reference books, museum specimens, 
pictures, etc. The needs of high school pupils are considered, and courses are 
outlined and methods discussed to meet them. 

Geography 6. (C.) Industrial geography. Mr. Cushing. 

Fourth year. Two recitations and two hours of preparation weekly, 
with an afternoon every third week for studying a local industry at first 
hand. 

The course considers industries and their geographical relations; their loca- 
tion; source of power; character of labor; geographical destination and trans- 
portation of their finished products; and processes as far as they help explain 
the need of certain raw materials or indicate the need of the consumers in certain 
environments. A study is made of the industrial rank of nations. The course is 
particularly designed to prepare students to teach commercial geography in the 
industrial centers of New England. 



HISTORY AND SOCIAL SCIENCE 

History and Social Science 1. (A, B.) Problems in government 
and methods in teaching history and social science. Miss Cooper. 
First year. Two recitations and two hours of preparation weekly. 

First half year. The social and political problems immediately before the 
nation to-day are emphasized by a study of the historical growth of the nation's 
government, local, State and national. 

Second half year. A general survey of the work of the first six grades of the 
elementary schools in history and social science; criticism of the historical 
literature lor children; and a consideration of the methods of teaching history 
and social science. 



29 

History and Social Science 2. (A.) American history and 
methods in teaching history and social science. Miss Cooper. 
Second year. Two recitations and two hours of preparation weekly. 

A survey of the subject-matter of American and related European history to 
broaden the student's conception of history, its aims and its methods of study. 
Emphasis is placed on collateral reading in order that a broader knowledge of 
historical literature may be gained. Stress is laid upon current questions 
of history to bring out more clearly the relation of the past and present. The 
work in the pedagogy of history, begun in the first year, is continued in this 
year. 

History and Social Science 3. (B.) American history and 
methods in teaching history and social science in the intermediate 
school. Miss Cooper. 

Second year. Two recitations and two hours of preparation weekly. 

A study of early American history with related units of general history. 
Extended collateral reading is given to develop the student in historical methods, 
and the pedagogy of history for the intermediate school is begun. 

History and Social Science 4. (B.) American history and 
methods in teaching history and social science in the intermediate 
school. Miss Cooper. 

Third year. Four recitations and four hours of preparation weekly. 

This course is designed to carry on the work of the preceding courses, making 
a more intensive study of certain periods of American history and government 
with their European background. It also includes a treatment of the methods 
of teaching history and social science in the seventh and eighth grades. 

History and Social Science 5. (C.) Economic and industrial 
history of Europe. Miss Cooper. 

First year. Two recitations and two hours of preparation weekly. 

By a survey of the history of Europe from the eve of the Middle Ages to the 
present time an attempt is made to give a basis for the understanding of present 
social, political and economic conditions of modern States. 

History and Social Science 6. (C.) Economic and industrial 
history of the United States. Miss Cooper. 

Second year. Three recitations and three hours of preparation weekly. 

Aim: to acquaint the student with the social, political and economic develop- 
ment of the United States during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, and, 
by a detailed study of the nation's government, to bring to him a realization of 
the growing organization, ideals and functions of that government. 



30 

History and Social Science 7. (C.) History of modern com- 
merce. Mr. Sproul. 

First half of fourth year. Three recitations and four hours of prepara- 
tion weekly. 

Aim: to promote a proper understanding of the value of commerce to national 
and individual life. The course includes a study of present-day tendencies in 
commerce and allied fields. The laboratory method is used where possible. 

History and Social Science 8. (C.) Economics. Contemporary 
economic problems. Mr. Sproul. 

Second half of fourth year. Three recitations and four hours of prepara- 
tion weekly. 

A study of economics, based on present-day problems, carried on through 
type studies, current literature and personal investigation. 

History and Social Science 9. (C.) Commercial law. Mr. 

Sproul. 

Fourth year. Two recitations and two and one-half hours of prepara- 
tion weekly. 

An inductive study of the application of the principles of justice to ordinary 
commercial relationships, aiming to develop a judicial habit of mind in the con- 
sideration of business affairs, and to acquaint the pupil with some of the more 
commoD requirements of business iaws. 



MUSIC 

Music 1. (A, B.) Elementary music. Mr. Archibald. 
First year. One recitation and one hour of preparation weekly. 

Voice training, sight reading, ear training, and writing of symbols used to 
represent the time and tune of music. The subject-matter of this course is 
practically the work of the first six grades of the elementary school. 

Music 2. (A.) Mr. Archibald. 

Second year. One recitation and one hour of preparation weekly. 

Aim : to f amiliarize the students with the music work of the first six grades, 
and to acquaint them with the best ways of presenting the problems. The child 
voice, song interpretation, part singing are some of the topics discussed. Outlines 
of the grade work are given and teaching plans of the principal subjects are made. 
Melody writing as a means of illustrating the various problems is required. 

Music 3. (B.) Mr. Archibald. 

Second year. One recitation and one hour of preparation weekly. 

In addition to the work of Music 3 is required the study of the problems de- 
veloped in three and four part singing, and in the boy's changing voice and its 
development. 



31 

Music 4. (A, B, C.) Music appreciation and general singing. 
Mr. Archibald. 

Required of all members of the school. One recitation weekly through 
out the course. 

Programs of folk songs and dances, art songs and composers are prepared and 
presented by students. The Victrola and pianola are used in this work. During 
the year several concerts and lectures are given by people well known in the 
musical world. Singing of standard choruses. 



EDUCATION 

Education 1. (A, B.) Applied psychology and pedagogy. Mr. 

Allen. 

First year. Three recitations and three hours of preparation weekly. 

A study of the mind as familiar in every-day life and in the schoolroom, 
leading to ideas of development in body and mind, and of purposeful guidance in 
that development as the work of education; modes of learning discovered are 
applied practically to processes of teaching and management ; directed observa- 
tion in the training school to demonstrate processes of instruction, the planning 
of lessons and the reasons underlying; types of lessons, principles of class and 
school management, measurement, supervision, general and special aims of 
education. This course is planned in immediate preparation for intelligent 
practice teaching in the senior year and general preparation for later professional 
work. 

Education 2. (A.) Pedagogy. Mr. Pitman. 

Second year. One recitation and two hours of preparation weekly. 

General and specific aims of edacation; discussion of current educational 
problems; school administration, including classroom management; school laws 
of Massachusetts. 

Education 3. (B.) Pedagogy. Mr. Pitman. 

Third year. Four recitations and four hours of preparation weekly. 

Contemporaneous problems in elementary education; special investigations 
and reports; school administration. 

Education 4. (C.) Elementary psychology. Miss Goldsmith. 
Second year. Three recitations and three to four hours of preparation 
weekly. 

The course aims to give an understanding of the fundamental laws which 
govern mental activity, and, by attention to the processes by means of which 
knowledge is obtained and formulated, to lay a foundation for the course in 
pedagogy. 



32 

Education 5. (C.) Pedagogy and its application in commercial 
teaching. Mr. Sproex. 

Fourth year. Two recitations and two hours of preparation weekly. 

A course preparing for the teaching of commercial subjects; general methods 
and methods of teaching the special subjects, covering briefly the history, func- 
tion and scope of commercial training in the high school. 

Education 6. (A.) Practice teaching. 

Second year. Ten weeks, thirty periods weekly. 
Education 7. (B.) Practice teaching. 
Second and third year. Ten weeks, thirty periods weekly. 
Education 8. (C.) Practice teaching. 

Fourth year. Ten weeks, thirty periods weekly. 



PRACTICAL ARTS AND PINE ARTS 

Practical Arts 1. (A, B.) A course dealing with simple projects 
in industrial arts. Mr. Whitney and Miss Solomon. 

One-half of first year. Three recitations and one hour of preparation 
weekly. 

Aims: to train teachers for the first six grades of elementary schools along 
practical and industrial lines ; to give the ability to make, read and apply simple 
structural drawings and patterns; to use simple hand tools; and to apply this 
knowledge to other studies in the curriculum. There is frequent observation of 
the work in the training school, visits to shops, gardens, etc. 

Fine Arts 1. (A, B.) A course in drawing, color, design and art 
appreciation. Mr. Whitney and Miss Solomon. 

One-half of first year. Three recitations and one hour of preparation 
weekly. 

The course is designed to create and foster a knowledge and appreciation of 
art. There is frequent observation of teaching and methods in the training 
school. The illustrative work is closely related to other studies in the curriculum. 
A general review of work experienced or observed in the public schools is 
included. 

Practical Arts 2. (A.) A course dealing with elementary projects 
in such lines as bookbinding, pottery, weaving, etc. Mr. Whitney. 

One-half of second year. Two recitations and two hours of preparation 
weekly. 

As in the previous course the aims are: the ability to make, read and apply 
structural drawings and patterns to the actual construction of simple projects; 
the ability to teach such work in the first six grades in the elementary schools; 
to appreciate purpose and fitness and good structural design; and to apply these 
to all industrial work. 



33 

Fine Arts 2. (A.) A course in drawing, color, design, art appre- 
ciation and methods of teaching. Mr. Whitney. 

One-half of second year. Two recitations and two hours of preparation 
weekly. 

Aims: to prepare teachers for the first six grades of elementary schools and 
to cultivate taste and art appreciation. Courses of study are planned and 
methods of teaching are studied and applied in the actual work in the training 
school. Blackboard sketching is applied in other studies in the curriculum. 

Practical Arts 3. (B.) Mr. Whitney. 

One-half of second year. Two recitations and two hours of preparation 
weekly. 

Same as Practical Arts 2, except that the course consists of more advanced 
projects, adapted to grades 7, 8 and 9; observation and practice in sewing, cook- 
ing, modeling and gardening for the women ; and in printing, woodworking and 
gardening for the men. 

Fine Arts 3. (B.) Mr. Whitney. 

One-half of second year. Two recitations and two hours of preparation 
weekly. 

This course includes harmonics of color to be applied to school projects, the 
interior of the schoolroom or home; plans and color schemes for flower gardens, 
etc.; decorative and applied design; pictorial drawing involving principles of 
foreshortening and convergence; picture study; nature drawing; and black- 
board sketching. 

Practical Arts 4. (B.) Intended to familiarize the pupil with 
the courses of study, methods and demands made upon teachers 
in the intermediate school. Mr. Whitney. 

One-half of third year. Four recitations or shop periods and two hours 
of preparation weekly. 

Observation and practice in mechanical drawing, bookbinding, modeling and 
printing. The school and home gardens are planned, drawings made to scale 
and the color schemes applied. 

Fine Arts 4. (B.) Methods and practice for students preparing 
to teach in the higher grades in elementary schools. Mr. Whitney. 

One-half of third year. Four recitations and two hours of preparation 
weekly. 

Aims: to offer a general survey of the history of architecture, sculpture and 
painting; to familiarize the pupils with the work required in the higher grades 
along the lines of drawing, applied design, nature work, etc. The course com- 
prises the preparation and dyeing of papers, reeds and fabrics for the work in 
practical arts ; the making and application of good designs in form and decora- 



34 

tion; the drawing of trees, plants and details studied in the nature course; and 
the drawing of simple objects and groups in outline, mass and color. The major 
part of the course is devoted to definite school projects, methods and practice 
teaching. 

Practical Arts 5. (A.) Gardening 1. Miss Goldsmith. 
Second year. Comprising the work in nature study for the spring 
months. 

Aim: to give practical experience in garden work and acquaint the student 
with methods and devices for carrying on school and home gardens. 

Practical Arts 6. (B.) Gardening. Mr. Goldsmith. 

A garden, comprising half an acre, is worked on the community basis, and is 
planted entirely to vegetables, which are sold to families living in the vicinity of 
the school and to local dealers. This garden is planted, cared for, and the prod- 
ucts harvested and marketed, by the boys of the seventh and eighth grades. 

The men of the senior class are expected to observe and direct the work. 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Physical Education 1. (A, B.) Physical training. Miss Warren. 
First year. Three periods weekly. 

This course is designed to improve the physical condition of the student. It 
includes plays and games and methods of teaching them, with emphasis on the 
learning of the games and playing them. Folk dancing and corrective exercises 
are important features of the work. 

Physical Education 2. (A.) Physical training. Miss Warren. 
Second year. Three periods weekly. 

This course aims to prepare the student to teach such exercises as may be used 
in the first six grades of the elementary schools, as story plays, folk dancing and 
both outdoor and indoor games. 

Physical Education 3. (B.) Physical training. Miss Warren. 

Second year. Three periods weekly. 

Teaching lessons in folk dancing and games suitable for upper grades are pre- 
pared by the students. Some time is devoted to formal gymnastic work. Op- 
portunities to supervise groups of children in the playground and in the gym- 
nasium and to do some corrective work are utilized. 

Physical Education 4. (A.) General hygiene. Miss Warren. 
Second year. Two recitations and two hours of preparation weekly. 

Discussion of methods frequently takes the place of the recitation. The 
teaching of hygiene in a normal school has a twofold purpose, — to help the 



35 

student to realize how he may maintain in his own body the highest possible 
working efficiency, and to train him to present the subject to children in such a 
manner as to bring about a marked improvement in their standard of health. 

Physical Education 5. (B.) Hygiene and sanitation. Miss 

Warren. 

Third year. Two recitations and two hours of preparation weekly. 

Aim: to train students to present those phases of hygiene and sanitation 
which can best be understood by pupils in the upper grammar grades. Em- 
phasis is placed upon public health problems, as milk and water supply, housing, 
sewage disposal and infectious diseases. Attention is also given to the intelligent 
treatment of emergency cases. 

Physical Education 6. (C.) Personal hygiene. Miss Warren. 
First year. One recitation and one and one-half hours of preparation 
weekly. 

The purpose of the course is to aid the student to form right habits of living, 
and to furnish accurate knowledge of social hygiene, including personal, family, 
city, State and industrial hygiene. 



PRACTICAL SCIENCE 

Practical Science 1. (A.) Nature study. Miss Goldsmith. 
Second year. Four recitations and four to six hours of preparation 
weekly. 

Occasional papers. Laboratory work given in place of regular preparation or 
recitation at the discretion of the instructor. The course aims to give a general 
training in the fundamentals of biological science and methods of teaching gen- 
eral nature study material in the grades. 

Practical Science 2. (A, B.) Mr. Whitman. 

Second year. Two recitations and two hours of preparation weekly. 

Consideration is given to science questions of the home, school, public utili- 
ties, manufactures, trades and arts which come within the range of the student's 
experience. The course is intended to afford a broad outlook over the field of 
general science, and an insight into the ways in which science is useful to man. 
The project method is employed as far as practicable. Excursions to show 
practical applications in the arts and industries occur frequently. 

Practical Science 3. (B.) Mr. Whitman. 

Third year. Two recitations and two hours of preparation weekly. 

This course is chiefly of a professional nature. It deals with the place of 
science in the curriculum of the intermediate school. Outline courses for the 
seventh and eighth grades will be prepared and tested in the training school and 
in other schools with which the normal school is affiliated. The biological side 



36 

of science will receive some attention, but the chief aim of the course is to find 
for the physical sciences the same useful place in the grades that has already- 
been established for nature study. 

Practical Science 4. (C.) Mr. Whitman. 

First year. Two recitations and two hours of preparation weekly. 

A study of general science in its relations to the arts and industries, particu- 
larly those within the immediate environment of the students. Frequent 
excursions, investigations and reports. The course is closely related to that in 
industrial geography. 

SHORTHAND 

Shorthand 1. (C.) Benn Pitman. Introductory course. Miss 

ROLLINSON. 

First year. Four recitations and five hours of preparation weekly. 

Principles of the system are mastered, keeping the professional side in view, 
and a fair amount of speed in new matter is acquired. 

Shorthand 2. (C.) Benn Pitman. Intermediate course. Miss 

ROLLINSON. 

Second year. Three recitations and four hours of preparation weekly. 

Principles are reviewed thoroughly, speed work is continued, and classics, 
which are written in shorthand, are read and studied. 

Shorthand 3. (C.) Benn Pitman. Methods course. Miss 

ROLLINSON. 

Fourth year. Three recitations and four hours of preparation weekly. 

Aim: to present the best methods of teaching shorthand. This includes a 
study of pedagogical works on the subject of shorthand, observation teaching, 
plan work and training. Comparison of texts and systems also enters into this 
course. 

Shorthand 4. (C.) Benn Pitman. Miss Morse. For special 
students who are admitted to a one-year course. Five recitations and eight 
hours of preparation weekly. 

A brief but comprehensive course in the Benn Pitman system, including a 
thorough training in the principles of the system, together with parallel discus- 
sions of the methods to be employed in their presentation. 

Shorthand 5. (C.) Gregg. Miss Rollinson. Elective for students 
who have already completed a course in Gregg shorthand. 

One recitation and one and one-half hours of preparation weekly. The 
course consists of a review of principles with the professional idea in mind, speed 
dictation and method work. 



37 



TYPEWRITING 

Typewriting 1. (C.) Foundation course for beginners. Miss 
Morse. 

First year. Five laboratory periods weekly. 

Aim: to make of each student an accurate touch operator, at the same time 
acquainting him with the fundamentals of letter-writing. Simple accuracy tests 
are held during the second half year. 

Typewriting 2. (C.) Advanced course. Miss Morse. 
Second year. Three laboratory periods and one-half hour of prepara- 
tion weekly. 

The work of this course supplements that of Typewriting 1, emphasis being 
laid on speed as well as accuracy in work done. Accuracy and speed tests are 
held throughout the year. 

Note. — The speed tests given are the regular award tests offered by the 
different typewriter companies, and students passing them receive certificates 
or medals. 

Typewriting 3. (C.) Methods course. Miss Morse. 
Fourth year. Three periods, recitation and laboratory, and two hours 
of preparation weekly. 

This course discusses the work of Typewriting 1 and Typewriting 2 from the 
professional viewpoint. General methods are considered, textbooks are exam- 
ined and criticized, courses of study, adapted to different groups of students, 
are planned. 

Typewriting 4. (C.) Miss Morse. 

For special students who are admitted to a one-year course. Five 
periods, laboratory and recitation, and two to three hours of preparation 
during the second half-year. 

This course covers the work of Typewriting 1, 2 and 3, and is so planned as 
to make it possible for either a beginner or an advanced student to complete the 
required amount of work in one year. 



BOOKKEEPING 

Bookkeeping 1. (C.) Introductory course. Miss Rollinson. 
First year. Two recitations and three hours of preparation weekly. 
(Taken in conjunction with Bookkeeping la). 

Aim: to teach elementary principles and bookkeeping routine. 



38 

Bookkeeping la. (C.) Principles of accounts. Mr. Sproul. 
First year. One recitation and one and one-half hours of preparation 
weekly (taken in conjunction with Bookkeeping 1). 

The course develops the principles of debit and credit, various expedients for 
recording transactions, theory and purpose of the account, and instructs the 
pupil in the formulation of the usual business statements. 

Bookkeeping 2. (C.) Advanced course. Mr. Sproul. 
Second year. Three recitations and four and one-half hours of prepara- 
tion weekly. 

Special attention is given to principles underlying the construction of accounts 
and their classifications, and the preparation and interpretation of business 
statements to show condition and progress of the business. The application of 
accounts to varied lines of work undertaken, elements of cost accounting and 
variations due to form of organization are studied. 

Bookkeeping 3. (C.) Elementary accounting. Mr. Sproul. 
Fourth year. Three recitations and four and one-half hours of prepara- 
tion weekly. 

Comprehensive study of balance sheets and statements of various kinds; 
detailed consideration of assets and liabilities, depreciation, reserves, surplus, 
capital and revenue expenditures, statements of affairs, deficiency account, 
realization and liquidation statements; also, study of accounts of nontrading 
concerns, as societies, clubs, etc. The course closes with instruction in methods 
of teaching bookkeeping in high schools. 

Bookkeeping 4. (C.) Elementary bookkeeping and methods of 
teaching. Miss Rollinson. 

For special students who are admitted to a one-year course. Two reci- 
tations and two hours of preparation weekly (taken in conjunction with 
Bookkeeping 4a). 

A course combining instruction in bookkeeping principles and practice with 
instruction in methods of presentation in high schools. 

Bookkeeping 4a. (C.) Theory of accounts. Mr. Sproul. 

For special students who are admitted to a one-year course. Two reci- 
tations and two hours of preparation weekly (taken in conjunction with 
Bookkeeping 4). 

Similar to Bookkeeping la, but the maturity of the pupil and additional 
time permit of more extended and comprehensive work. 



39 



LECTURES AND CONCERTS 

The following lectures and concerts have been given at the 
school since the issue of the last catalogue: — 



Social Phases of School Work . 

The Manual Arts in Social Service Work . 

Memorial Day address: The Battle Sum- 
mer ....... 

Graduation address: Education, Mod- 
ernly Speaking ..... 

The Place of Civics in the Curriculum 

Teaching to Teach .... 

The Promotion of Temperance 

Reading: Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde . 

India and the Far East .... 

Lincoln Day program: readings 

Opera talks ...... 

Madam Butterfly 
La Boheme 
Lohengrin 
Tannhauser 

Concert 

Concert 

Concert 

Pianoforte recital 

Concert 



Dr. George D. Stray er 
Alvin E. Dodd 

Alfred S. Roe 

Dr. George H. Martin 
H. A. Nightingale 
Dr. A. E. Winship 
Warren P. Landers 
John Duxbury 
Charles S. Crosman 
Judge Alden P. White 
Havrah W. L. Hubbard 



Mendelssohn String Quartet 
Durell String Quartet 
Myrtle Jordan Trio 
Pemberton Whitney 
Lotus Quartet 



THE ART CLUB 

Students have frequently expressed a desire for a further 
study of art than the regular course affords. For this reason, 
members of the faculty and students have organized an art 
club, meeting at least twice in the month for the study of art 
in various phases. This study includes papers by the mem- 
bers on the schools of painting; visits to the Museum of Fine 
Arts, the Boston Art Club, and other art galleries; visits to 
places of historic interest; out-of-door sketching; and ad- 
vanced work along industrial lines. 



40 



THE MUSICAL CLUBS ' 

A glee club, selected by competition, rehearses weekly, sings 
at various entertainments of the school, and gives an annual 
concert. An orchestra of stringed instruments is also one of 
the musical activities of the school. 

Tickets for the concerts of the Boston Symphony Orchestra 
and for the Boston Opera Company are obtained for students 
upon application. 



THE MANAGEMENT OF THE SCHOOL 

Students in a school for the professional training of teachers 
should be self-governing in the full sense of the term. Each 
student is allowed and is encouraged to exercise the largest 
degree of personal liberty consistent with the rights of others. 
The teachers aim to be friends and leaders. They will not 
withhold advice, admonition and reproof, if needed; but their 
relations in these respects are usually with individuals instead 
of with classes, and are of the most helpful and generous 
nature. Those students who, after full and patient trial, are 
found unable to exercise self-control and unworthy of con- 
fidence, are presumed to be unfit or unlikely to become suc- 
cessful teachers, and will be removed from the school. Others, 
also, who through no fault of their own, but in consequence of 
conspicuous inaptitude, or physical or mental deficiencies, are 
unfit for the work of teaching, will be advised to withdraw, 
and will not be graduated. 

Many matters pertaining to the general welfare of the school 
are referred for consideration to the school council. This is a 
representative body, consisting of the principal and two other 
members of the faculty, and members chosen by each di- 
vision of the senior, middle and junior classes. Thus the 
students, through their representatives, have a voice in the 
management of the school, and also assume their share of the 
responsibility for its success. 



41 



Regulations 

1. Regular and prompt attendance at all sessions of the 
school is expected of every student. Those who find it neces- 
sary to be absent for more than a single day should so inform 
the principal. For all avoidable absence — including that for 
teaching as substitutes — the permission of the principal must 
be obtained in advance. 

2. Students who are withdrawing from the school must 
inform the principal of their decision, and must return all the 
books and other property of the school which are charged to 
them. Those who fail to do so promptly must not expect any 
recommendation or indorsement from the school. 

3. Any property of the school which is lost or seriously 
injured by students must be paid for by them. 

4. Although the school has no dormitories, it recommends 
to students who are to live away from their homes several 
houses in Salem where board and room may be obtained at 
reasonable prices. These houses, in addition to being suitable 
in other respects as homes for students, meet the following 
conditions which are prescribed by the State Board of Edu- 
cation: They receive no boarders other than students and 
instructors of the normal school; the same house does not 
receive both men and women students; the number of students 
in any one house is limited to the family group of eight. 

All students who board away from their homes during their 
membership in the school are required to live in the houses 
recommended by the school. Exceptions to this rule may be 
made for those whose parents wish them to live with relatives 
or personal friends, but in such cases the parents must inform 
the principal of the school of the circumstances, in writing, 
and receive his approval. No change in boarding place may 
be made by any student without the previous consent of 
the principal. 

Students living in groups in approved houses are expected 
to form habits which are to the advantage of their own work 
and that of their companions. The hours from seven to nine- 
thirty in the evening should be observed as a period of study. 



42 

Except under unusual conditions, lights should be out by ten 
o'clock. If students find it necessary, for any reason, to be 
absent from the house for an evening they should inform their 
landladies of their plans. 

Those who receive our students into their homes must, of 
necessity, assume responsibility for their conduct in the 
same measure as would be required of teachers in charge of a 
dormitory. They are therefore expected to report to the 
principal any impropriety of conduct on the part of students 
which ought to be known by him, or any behavior of theirs 
which would be considered improper in a well-regulated 
dormitory. 

Expenses, Aid, Loan Funds 

Expenses. — Tuition is free to all residents of Massachusetts 
who declare their intention to teach in the schools of this 
Commonwealth. Students admitted from other States are 
required to pay a tuition fee of $50 per year, of which sum 
one-half is due September 9 and the other half February 1. 
Textbooks and supplies are free, as in the public schools. 
Articles used in school work which students may desire to 
own will be furnished at cost. The expense of board for two 
students rooming together, within easy distance of the school, 
is from $5.50 each per week upward. 

School Restaurant. — A restaurant is maintained in the build- 
ing, in which is served at noon each school day a good variety 
of wholesome and attractive food at very reasonable prices. 

State Aid. — To assist those students, residents of Massa- 
chusetts, who find it difficult to meet the expenses of the 
course, pecuniary aid is furnished by the State to a limited 
extent. Applications for this aid must be made in writing to 
the principal, and must be accompanied by such evidence as 
shall satisfy him that the applicant needs assistance. This 
aid, however, is not furnished to residents of Salem, nor 
during the first half year of attendance at the school. 

Loan Funds. — Through the generosity of members of the 
faculty and graduates of the school several funds have been 



43 

established, all of which, by vote of the Salem Normal School 
Association, are administered by the principal as loan funds. 
Students may thus borrow reasonable sums of money with 
which to meet their expenses during their connection with the 
school, and payment may be made at their convenience, after 
they have secured positions as teachers. 

Besides the Students' Benefit Fund are other funds, founded 
by graduates of the school as memorials to Dr. Richard G. 
Edwards, principal from 1854 to 1857; to Prof. Alpheus 
Crosby, principal from 1857 to 1865; to Dr. Daniel B. Hagar, 
principal from 1865 to 1895; and to Dr. Walter P. Beckwith, 
principal from 1895 to 1905. The total amount of money now 
available is about $2,000. The principal will gladly receive 
and credit to any of the above funds such contributions as 
graduates and friends of the school may be disposed to make. 
Frequently a little timely financial aid from this source may 
save to the profession an efficient teacher. 

Employment for Graduates 

The increase in the number of normal school graduates em- 
ployed in Massachusetts as teachers has been, especially during 
the past twenty years, very much greater proportionately than 
the increase in the whole number of teachers, but even at the 
present time they constitute less than seventy per cent, of all 
the teachers in the State, and the demand is annually greater 
than the supply; especially for the higher grammar grades 
there is a marked scarcity of strong candidates. Although 
the school does not undertake to guarantee positions to its 
students, it is a fact that graduates of any department are 
rarely without positions three months after graduation. The 
principal takes pleasure in assisting them to obtain such posi- 
tions as they are qualified to fill. To that end he is glad to 
correspond or to confer with school authorities. He also 
wishes to be kept informed concerning the degree of success in 
teaching of former students. 



44 

Scholarships for Graduates 

There are offered at Harvard University four scholarships, 
each of an annual value of $150, for the benefit of students in 
Harvard College who are graduates of any reputable normal 
school in the United States. 

Notices to School Officials 

All interested persons, especially those connected in any way 
with educational work, are cordially invited to visit the school, 
to inspect the buildings and equipment, or to attend the exer- 
cises in its classrooms or training schools at any time and 
without ceremony. 

During the summer vacation some person qualified to give 
information regarding the school, its work and the conditions 
of admission will be at the building each forenoon except 
Saturday. Requests for catalogues are always promptly 
honored. 

Superintendents and other school officials are requested to 
send to the school copies of their reports, courses of study and 
other publications of common interest. The courtesy will be 
appreciated and reciprocated. 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

Historical Sketch 

The State Normal School at Salem was opened to students 
September 12, 1854. It was the fourth normal school estab- 
lished by the State of Massachusetts. Its first building stood 
at the corner of Broad and Summer streets. This was en- 
larged and improved in 1860, and again in 1871. After 
twenty-five years the accommodations proved inadequate to 
meet the increased demands made upon modern normal 
schools, and an appropriation was made by the Legislature for 
a new building, which was first occupied by the school Decem- 
ber 2, 1896. A new training school building was occupied for 
the first time December 2, 1913. The site, buildings and 
equipment represent an expenditure of $500,000; and it is 



45 



believed that the Commonwealth here possesses an educational 
plant as complete and convenient as any of its kind in this 
country. 

Decorations 

It is generally conceded that no building or schoolroom is 
finished or furnished which lacks beautiful and artistic decora- 
tions, not only because these objects are beautiful in them- 
selves, but because of their refining and educative value. 
There is a silent influence resulting from the companionship 
of good pictures or casts, elevating the thought, and creating 
a dislike for the common, ugly and inferior type of decoration 
so often seen. The school has many pictures and casts, the 
gifts of the students, the faculty and other friends of the 
school, and all these have been selected with great care and 
artistic judgment, so that the whole is harmonious. 

The Teachers and Students 

The school during its history has had five principals and 
ninety-two assistant teachers. The development of the prac- 
tice schools began in 1897, and with them fifty-five persons 
have been connected as teachers. Twenty teachers are now 
required in the normal school and nine in the training schools. 

Nearly sixty-seven hundred students have attended the 
school. The proportion of those who complete the course has 
been increasing steadily in recent years. 

The Location and Attractions of Salem 

No place in northeastern Massachusetts is more easily ac- 
cessible than Salem. It is on the main line of the eastern 
division of the Boston & Maine Railroad system, connecting 
with the Saugus branch at Lynn. A branch road to Wake- 
field Junction connects the city with the western division. 
There is direct communication with Lowell, Lawrence, Haver- 
hill, Rockport and Marblehead. Trains are frequent and con- 
venient. Salem is also the center of an extensive network of 
electric railways. Students coming daily to Salem on Boston 



46 

& Maine trains can obtain season tickets at greatly reduced 
rates. Trains on the Marblehead branch stop at Loring 
Avenue, on signal, and many students find it more convenient 
to purchase their season tickets to that station. 

Salem is the center of many interesting historical associa- 
tions, and within easy reach are the scenes of more important 
and stirring events than can be found in any other equal area 
of our country. The scenery, both of seashore and country 
in the neighborhood, is exceedingly attractive. There are 
many libraries, besides the free public library, and curious and 
instructive collections belonging to various literary and anti- 
quarian organizations, to which access may be obtained at a 
slight expense. Lectures are frequent and inexpensive. The 
churches of the city represent all the religious denominations 
that are common in New England. 



47 



Register of Students 
1914 = 1915 



Graduates, — Class XCIX 


> — « 


June 16, 1914 


Elementary Department 


Allen, Amelia Southworth . . Lynn 


Allen, Katharine 








. Maiden 


Aylward, Mary Ella . 








. Salem 


Beattie, Margaret 








. Somerville 


Benjamin, Lea Josephine 








. Beverly 


Bessom, Rachel Ursula 








. Lynn 


Bray, Helen Crosby . 








. Beverly 


Bresnahan, Nora Veronica 








. Lynn 


Bridge, Mary 








. Wakefield 


Burnham, Elizabeth . 








. Essex 


Cairnes, Charlotte Margaret 








. Cambridge 


Callahan, Esther Marie . 








. Lynn 


Campbell, Lorena King . 








. East Lynn 


Canfield, Anna Rose 








. Somerville 


Carr, Florence Cowdrey . 








. Stoneham 


Cashman, Mary Theresa 








. North Cambridge 


Caulfield, Helen Frances . 








. . Salem 


Clausmeyer, Helen Louise 








. West Roxbury 


Cody, Margaret Ellen 








. Peabody 


Coffey, Mary Agnes . 








. Medford 


Cohen, Annie 








. Dorchester 


Cohn, Dorothy Reva . ■ 








. Maiden 


Colcord, Elizabeth Jacobs 








. Melrose 


Commins, Lillian Frances 








. Somerville 


Condon, Elizabeth Anne . 








. Salem 


Connor, Madeline Elizabeth 








. Medford 


Convery, Mary Ellen 








. Everett 


Cotton, Rachel Ethridge . 








.'. Maiden 


Cowden, Esther Brownell 








. Amesbury 


Cox, Adeline Elizabeth . 








. Dorchester 



48 



Curley, Teresa Mary Marblehead 

Currier, Ethel May . North Andover 

Dalton, Grace Elizabeth North Cambridge 

Del Gratta, Celia West Everett 

Dennehey, Mary Anne Beverly 

Dolan, Ada Vincentia Medford 

Dugmore, Ethel Frances Medford 

Ellis, Annie Louise Peabody 

FitzGerald, Lucy Agnes Charlestown 

Fletcher, Julia Esther ...... Maiden 

Fogg, Helen May . Methuen 

Freeto, Elsie Warren Marblehead 

Galvin, Kathleerj Matilda Maiden 

Glines, Ruth Marguerite Beverly 

Godfrey, Rose Anna Salem 

Goldman, Ida Josephine Salem 

Goldsmith, Josephine Mildred .... Dorchester 

Hall, Adeline Frances Wakefield 

Hauley, Esther Marie Belmont 

Hanlon, Nellie Louise Salem 

Harrington, Alice Agnes North Cambridge 

Hay, Isabel Nelson ....... Lynn 

Healey, Edythe Alana Lynn 

Hedberg, Hildegarde Beatrice .... Maiden 

Henderson, Helen Esther Roxbury 

Higgins, Mary Alice Lynn 

Huntington, Flora Evelyn . .• . . . Newburyport 

Jeffs, Ruth Evelyn Salem 

Killion, Crescentia Madeline Maiden 

Larcom, Lucy Marshall Beverly 

Learoyd, Helen Danvers 

Locke, Edna Salem 

Loring, Annie Gladys Groveland 

Lufkin, Ruth Louise Gloucester 

Lundgren, Eleanor Marie Somerville 

Lyness, Mary Grace Lynn 

MacKay, Gladys Marjorie Cliftondale 

MacKinnon, Lilian May Newburyport 

McCauley, Emma Frances Salem 

McElroy, Mary Teresa Peabody 

McGlone, Mary Louise Peabody 



49 

McNally, Alice Roxbury 

Monaghan, Rose Ella Salem 

Morris, Mildred Bartlett Siasconset 

Murphy, Catherine Louise Lynn 

Murphy, Catherine Theresa North Cambridge 

Murray, Margaret Teresa Beverly Farms 

Nelson, Esther Ethel Lynnfield Centre 

Noble, Grace Lambert Beverly 

Nolan, Mary Frances Dorchester 

O'Brien, Helen Maiie Maiden 

O'Connor, Mary Angela . ... Cambridge 

O'Grady, Mary Elizabeth Salem 

O'Keefe, Marie Louise Salem 

O'Loughlin, Mary Emma Maiden 

Palmer, Jennie Carolyn Winthrop 

Payne, Elizabeth Perkins Wakefield 

Prime, Charlotte Katherine Rowley 

Randall, Mildred Frances Amesbury 

Reid, Bertha North Reading 

Riggs, Daisy May Gloucester 

Riordan, Julia May • Somerville 

Rose, Anna Dorothy Medford 

Sands, Ethel May Amesbury 

Sawyer, Frances Arline Lynn 

Smith, Mae Ethel Amesbury 

Smith, Hettie Christina Exeter, N. H. 

Stetefeld, Marguerite Catherine Elizabeth . . Somerville 

Stetson, Harriette Endicott Georgetown 

St. Pierre, Eliza Mary . . . . . . Salem 

Strandal, Hannah Christine Pigeon Cove 

Tenneson, Sadie Mathilda Arlington Heights 

Townsend, Henrietta Manchester 

Tuttle, Abbie Frances ...... Sanbornville, N. H. 

Twombly, May Abby Groveland 

Walsh, Anna Rose Somerville 

Webster, Marion Pearson Newburyport 

Welsh, Josephine Elizabeth . . . . . Maiden 

Whelpley, Blanche Lottie Arlington Heights 

Woolley, Rose Mary West Lynn , 

Wright, Ivy Lou Peabody 



50 



Intermediate Department 

George, Ida May Maiden 

Hourihan, Nellie Veronica Marblehead 

Parsons, Helen Gaffney Pigeon Cove 

Ward, Mary Grace Marblehead 



Commercial Department 



Three Years 



Campbell, Mildred Ward 
Carter, Ruth Hixon . 
Chase, Lenox Elspeth 
Coman, Clara Louise 
Cromwell, Marion Judson 
Hatch, Pearl Catherine . 
Hutchinson, Myron Robin 
Johnson, Hazeltine Robinson 
Kelly, Marion . 
Lamb, Emma Jennie 
McLaughlin, Sarah Jane . 
Moriarty, Marion Agnes . 
Mulally, Loretta Marion 
Parziale, Anna Cecelia 
Poland, Emma . 
Rankin, Austin Mader 
Richards, Edmund Francis 
Smith, Faustina Elma 
Vaile, Margaret Helen 
Williams, Georgiana 



Middleton 

Wlnchendon 

Amesbury 

Putnam, Conn. 

Chelsea 

Middleton 

Salem 

Peabody 

Everett 

Orange 

Nahant 

Danvers 

Danvers 

Chelsea 

Nahant 

Beverly 

Peabody 

Newburyport 

Danvers 

East Wenham 



Certificates for One Year's Work 
Elementary Department 

Moody, Pauline Frances Lynn 

Randall, Beatrice Asenath Cambridge 

Commercial Department 

Hinckley, Clara Louise Boston 

Hood, Mildred, A.B Brighton 

Jones, Eva Alberta Martha Salem 

McSweeny, Grace Catherine Pittsfield 

Renfrew, Marion, A.B Dorchester 



51 



Certificate for Two Years' Work 

Commercial Department 

Hall, Annie Waltham 

Olson, Charles Clarence Revere 



The Elementary Department 



Senior Class 
Adams, Lydia Osgood 
Adams, Rachel Webster . 
Anderson, Helen Natalie . 
Ashby, Dorothy Rogers . 
Babson, Anna Sanborn 
Bartlett, Elizabeth Phillips 
Bassett, Elsa Lavinia 
Bateman, Jessie Hale 
Boyd, Lillian Maude 
Breslasky, Bessie 
Bryant, Agnes Lee . 
Buchanan, Mary 
Burbank, Marguerite Elizabeth 
Burns, Julia Hilda 
Burreby, Genevieve Lauretta 
Bursey, Grace Mae . 
Byron, Eleanor Marie 
Canning, Marion Louise . 
Chouinard, Amelia Victoria 
Cochrane, Frances Agnes 
Coffin, Anna Burroughs . 
Collins, Alice Winifred 
Coyle, Ruperta Margaret 
Cressy, Helen Butler 
Cummings, Elizabeth Mary 
Cunningham, Elinor 
Curry, Agnes Dolan . 
D'Entremont, Mary Ursula 
Donaghue, Alice Eunice . 
Donovan, Alice Marie 
Donovan, Helen Winifred 
Driscoll, Helen Frances . 
Driscoll, Timothy John . 



Pittsfield, N. H. 

Pittsfield, N. H. 

Everett 

Salem 

Pigeon Cove 

Revere 

North Andover 

Georgetown 

Chelsea 

Dorchester 

Winthrop 

Chelsea 

Amesbury 

Gloucester 

Peabody 

Chelsea 

Peabody 

Lynn 

Salem 

Salem 

Marblehead 

Charlestown 

Wilder, Vt. 

Beverly 

Salem 

West Somerville 

East Lynn 

Essex 

Boston 

Salem 

Salem 

Salem 

North Andover 



52 



Durgin, Alice Townsend 
Elliott, Olive Cressy 
Epstein, Ethel Rhoda 
Everson, Mildred Frances 
Fallon, Ethel Mary . 
Fair, Helen Margaret 
Farrell, Catharine Irene 
Farrell, Esther . 
Fitzgerald, Anna ]\Iarie 
Galasso, Eva Victoria 
Gelavitz, Sophia 
Gibbs, Helen Pauline 
Grant, Mary Elizabeth 
Griffin, Alice May 
Gross, Ethel Mae 
Haggett, Mary Louisa 
Hames, Florence Emma 
Harnden, Dorothy Stacey 
Harrington, Anna Mabel 
Harris, Ruth Churchill 
Hatch, Esther . 
Hedberg, Agnes Helena 
Hill, Marion Ruth . 
Hines, Ruth Gladys . 
Hyland, Marion Adelaide 
Igo, Ruth Frances 
Innis, Mae Marguerite 
Jordan, Helen Rose . 
Kalker, Dorothy 
Kalunian, Mary 
Kane, Collet te Angela 
Kaplan, Frances 
Keating, Agnes Alary 
Kelly, Teresa Elizabeth 
Laffey, Mary Alma . 
Leahy, Katharine Frances 
Lewis, Marion Frances 
Littlefield, Abbie May 
Lorentzen, Laura 
Loschi, Margaret 
Lovette, Maud Estella Frances 



Swampscott 

Beverly 

Dorchester 

Saugus 

South Boston 

Sonierville 

Salem 

Chelsea 

Cambridge 

Boston 

Maiden 

Danvers 

Merriraac 

Peabody 

Somerville 

South Boston 

Chelsea 

Lynn 

North Cambridge 

Chelsea 

Chelsea 

Maiden 

Lynn 

Beverly 

Everett 

Cambridge 

West Somerville 

Beverly 

Maiden 

Cambridge 

Somerville 

Boston 

Somerville 

South Groveland 

Cambridge 

North Cambridge 

Kittery, Me. 

East L3mn 

Gloucester 

East Boston 

Everett 



53 



Lowe, Anna Austin . 
Lundgren, Dorothy Louise 
Lyman, Carrie May . 
Lynch, Anna Gertrude 
Lynch, Julia Frances 
Macadam, Charlotte Muriel 
Magner, Alice Evelyn 
Mahoney, Mary Alice 
Malone, Odessa Marion . 
Manley, Helen Gertrude . 
Marr, Helen Worcester . 
Martin, Jessie Campbell . 
McCann, Elizabeth Mary 
McCarthy, Mary Clare . 
McElroy, Helen Elizabeth 
McGrail, Mary Theresa . 
McKenna, Mary Louise . 
McLean, Mary Elizabeth 
McNally, Genevieve Elizabeth 
Misite, Adelina Gertrude 
Murdock, Rose Estelle 
Murphy, Mary Josephine 
Neales, Helen Neales 
Nelson, Sinius Joseph 
Neville, Azella Marie 
O'Connor, Helen Neilan . 
Parker, Eleanor Agnes 
Patriquin, Marion Elizabeth 
Pearson, Anna Maria 
Peebles, Fernald 
Perry, Dorothy . 
Pingree, Eleanor 
Porter, Marjorie Whitcomb 
Prescott, Edith Gertrude . 
Prescott, Sara Beatrice 
Quinlan, Helen Gertrude . 
Roberts, Mildred Elinor . 
Rock, Mary Theresa 
Ryan, Sabina Margaret . 
Sailer, Ethel May 
della Sala, Elenora Bianca 



East Lynn 

Somerville 

Methuen 

South Boston 

Peabody 

Dorchester 

Salem 

Cambridge 

Chelsea 

Medford 

Newburyport 

Swampscott 

Cambridge 

North Andover 

Peabody 

North Andover 

Somerville 

Roxbury 

Andover 

South Boston 

Chelsea 

Cambridge 

Chelsea 

Gloucester 

Salem 

Revere 

Maiden 

Lynn 

Winthrop 

Winthrop 

Lynn 

South Hamilton 

Swampscott 

Salem 

Cliftondale 

Reading 

Hyde Park 

Chelsea 

Marblehead 

Lynn 

Chelsea 



54 



Scheib, Ida Emilie . 
Schroeder, Florence Wilhelmina 
Sewell, Alta Marie . 
Simpson, Beatrice Alethea 
Smith, Inez Evelyn . 
Spinney, Sibyl Ion a . 
Stamper, Lucy Elliot 
Stevens, Irene . 
Sullivan, Alice Marie 
Sullivan, Eleanor Josephine 
Sweezey, Olive Lora 
Sweezey, Rena Vivian 
Talbot, Mary Elizabeth . 
Tarbox, Pauline Elizabeth 
Thacher, Olive Wilson 
Torngren, Lillie Tekla Alfreda 
Wade, Mary Foster . 
Walden, Ola Belle Susie . 
Wedger, Mildred 
Wheaton, Edith Gertrude 
Willey, Mabel Charlotte . 
Willey, Ruth . 
Wood, Marion Isabel 
Woodward, Rowena May 



Arlington Heights 

Someiville 

Lynn 

East Lynn 

Rowley 

Chelsea 

Salem 

Newburyport 

Dorchester • 

West Lynn 

Franklin Park 

Franklin Park 

West Lynn 

Maiden 

Beverly 

Beverly 

Ipswich 

Roxbury 

Chelsea 

Maiden 

Saugus 

Wakefield 

Cambridge 

Amesbury 



Special Students, One- Year Course 

Anderson, Ethel Bernhardina Portsmouth, N._H. 

Chisholm, Marion Belle Salem 

Ham, Harriet Priscilla Swampscott 

VigneroD, John Francis Cambridge 



The Intermediate Department 

Senior Class 

Broughton, Anna Margaret 
Campbell, Adaline Catherine 
Collins, Mary Hayden . . 
Dennehy, Mary Anne 
Eliason, Amelia Florence 
Fitts, Eva May 



Cambridge 

Revere 

Everett 

Beverly 

Gloucester 

North Reading 



55 



Hall, Adeline Frances 










Wakefield 


Kinsman, Clarice Hesson 








East Lynn 


Locke, Alice Merrill 








Salem 


MacKnight, Carolyn Martina 








Revere 


Moore, Gladys Emma . 








Franklin Park 


O'Grady, Mary Elizabeth 1 . 








Salem 


O'Keefe, Marie Louise 1 








Salem 


Oram, Lillian May 




"* 




Lynnfield 


Parsons, Ruth Isabel . 








Gloucester 


Payne, Elizabeth Perkins 








Wakefield 


Raymond, Lydia . 








Essex 


Roche, Marion Thecla . 








Salem 


Middle Year Class 


Driver, Daisy Belle North Andover 


Hogan, Charles Emerson 










Salem 


Mclntire, Mary Margaret 










Salem 


Perkins, Ruth Adele- 










Melrose Highlands 


Romkey, Alice Blanche 










Winchester 


Turner, Gilbert West . 










Salem 


Turner, Mary Evelyn . 










Lynn 


White, Richard James, Jr. 










Lynn 


Elementary and Intermediate Departments 


Junior Class 


Adams, Marion Eva ... . Melrose Highlands 


Anderson, Helen Margaret 






. Gloucester 


Anderson, Lucy Margaret 1 






. North Beverly 


Archer, Ethel Madeleine 






. Ipswich 


Babson, Clara Amy 






. Pigeon Cove 


Berry, Anna Lavinia 






. Salem 


Best, Dorothy Marion . 






. Roxbury 


Billings, Esther Marie . 






. Peabody 


Bjorkman, Lennart August William 




. Lynn 


Blanchard, Ruth Washburn 




. Danvers 


Bowen, Gertrude Elvesta 




. WestMedford 


Bo wen, Susie Frances .... 




. Ipswich 


Brown, Martha Delia 1 




. Hampton Falls, N. H. 


Buckle, Pauline Alice . ' . . 




. Beverly 



1 Was a member of the school less than three months. 



56 



Buckley, Johanna Beatrice Chariest own 

Bucknam, Stella Gertrude West Somerville 

Bumpus, Velma Claire . . . . . . Turner, Me. 

Burke, Katharine Ledevine Lynn 

Burnham, Ida Gordon * Gloucester 

Byrne, Katherine De Chantal .... Salem 

Cahill, Thomas Henry Salem 

Callahan, Katherine Frances . % . . . . Lynn 

Cameron, Margaret Arvilla Lynn 

Clough, Madeleine Louise Stoneham 

Cogswell, Edith Story Essex 

Coll, Anna Josephine Somerville 

Condon, Margaret Beroadette .... Charlestown 

Coombs, Marion Gladys x Cliftondale 

Corkum, Marigold Linda Alberta .... Chelsea 

Cunningham, Josephine Ellen .... Salem 

Daly, Joanna Teresa Salem 

Damon, Mildred Lane Salem 

Davol, Marion Eliza . . . . . . Maiden 

Desmond, Margaret Ellen Beverly 

Donnelly, Marion Josephine . . N . . . Somerville 

Doyle, Ethel Mary . . . . . . Lynn 

Driscoll, Bernadette Ursula Maiden 

Dunham, Marian Evelyn Danvers 

Eagan, Frances Claire Lynn 

Eberling, Agnes Emma Lynn 

Elliott, Iola Mae Stoneham 

Evans, Edna Smith Salem 

Evans, Eunice Isabell Newburyport 

Fenning, Ethel Mae Lynn 

Ferguson, Margaret Newton Centre 

Ferry, Esther Elizabeth Cambridge 

Flynn, Helen Frances Peabody 

Foley, Marguerita Redmond . . . ■ . . Dorchester 

Friend, Annie Ellery Gloucester 

Fullerton, Marion Saugus 

Galvin, Marie Agnes Lynn 

Grant, Helene Bailey Cambridge 

Gurvin, Mary Theresa Somerville 

Hale, Mildred Louise Salem 

1 Was a member of the school less than three months. 



57 



HaU, Dorothy Beryl 
Harrison, Alice Lorette . 
Haynes, Zelpha Louise 
Hellstrom, Emma Catherine 
Hennessy, Katherine Helen 
Henry, Julia Agnes . 
Hill, Malvina Harriet 
Hopkinson, Sarah Ella 
Horton, Anna Estelle 
Horton, Marvel Lillian 1 
Hubon, Charles Wilson 
Hurley, Mary Helen 
Jackman, LeRoy Williams 
Jordan, Olive Madeline 
Jurman, Bessie Jessie 
Keeley, Teresa Elizabeth 
Kennedy, Anna May 
Kennedy, Sadie Isabelle * 
Keith, Mary 

Knowlton, Marion Isabel 
Lakin, Florence May 
Lee, Isabelle Lawrenson 1 
Leddy, Evelyn Frances . 
Long, Sarah Jane 
Lund, May 

MacDonnell, Mary Helen 
Maclver, Helen 
Maguire, Gertrude Beatrice 
Malone, Mabelle Frances 
Mansfield, Sadie Elizabeth 
McCully, Anna Elizabeth 
McKenna, Margaret Elizabeth 
McMahon, Lillian Marie 
McMannus, Jeannette Marie 
McNiff, Ida Edwidge 
Miller, Isabella Gertrude 
Millett, Harold Joseph 
Mulligan, Louise Elizabeth 
Murray, Agnes De Ming 1 
Murray, Mary Helena 



West Lynn 

Lynn 

Amesbury 

West Lynn 

Lexington 

Chelsea 

Newburyport 

Groveland 

Wakefield 

Maiden 

Salem 

Maiden 

Newburyport 

Lynn 

East Boston 

Beverly 

West Lynn 

Gloucester 

Marblehead 

New London, N. H. 

Melrose 

Melrose 

Cambridge 

Cliftondale 

Beverly 

Lynn 

Essex 

Cambridge 

East Lynn 

Lynn 

Somerville 

Salem 

Salem 

Lynn 

North Andover 

Amesbury 

Salem 

Salem 

Gloucester 

Prides Crossing 



1 Was a member of the school less than three months. 



58 



Nelson, Inez Aurora 
Newball, Martha Louise . 
Nilsson, Anna Eieonora . 
Nolan, Alice Genevieve . 
Nolan, Mary Alice . 
O'Keefe, Mary Rose 
O'Shea, Marguerite Lorrette 
Parsons, Esther May 
Patten, Ethel Mildred 
Patten, Maude Frances . 
Patterson, Alice Mae Lewis 
Paul, Elizabeth Averill 
Pinkert, Edna Lois . 
Power, Elizabeth Frances 
Quillen, Anna Whelton 
Ramsburg, Helen 
Ratti, Isolena Celia . 
Reardon, Mary Veronica 
Rice, Sarah 
Riggs, Alice Gertrude 
Rimmer, Florence Ruth l 
Roache, Christine Lilhan 
Roads, Evelyn Lindsey . 
Robinson, Edith Maxwell 
Roby, Esther Clarion 
Rogers, Mary Frances 
Rutherford, Carita Gordon 
Ryder, Anna Greene 
Sargent, Katherine Louise 
Segal, Lillian 
Seymour, Mary Cecelia Welch 
Simmons, May Miller * 
Smith, Azella May . 
Spencer, Mary Elizabeth 
Stickney, Stephen Arthur 
Story, Marion Letitia 
Symonds, Mary Putnam . 
Tassinari, Ada Catherine 
Terrill, Irene Carleton Meserve 
Tewksbury, Ruth Skilling 



Gloucester 

Lynn 

Maiden 

Somerville 

Newburyport 

Cambridge 

Lynn 

Gloucester 

Melrose Highlands. 

Medford 

Somerville 

North Andover 

Maiden 

Lynn 

Reading 

Somersworth, N.H. 

Pigeon Cove 

North Andover 

Boston 

South Essex 

Maiden 

Lynn 

Marblehead 

Melrose 

Salem 

Dorchester 

Salem 

Marblehead 

North Andover 

East Boston 

Methuen 

Maiden 

Gloucester 

Maiden 

Peabody 

Salem 

Lynn 

Somerville 

Lynn 

Lawrence 



1 Was a member of the school less than three months. 



59 



Thomson, Alexander 
Thureson, Louise Elenora 
Townsend, Ethel 
True, Emma Louise . 
Yickerson, Bernice Helena 
Yirchow, Elfrieda Augusta 
Voorneveld, Katie Fenton 1 
Walker, Hester Ashton 
Walton, Effie Beatrice 
Weston, Helen . 
Whittier, Margaret Elizabeth 
Wilde, Bertha Hilma 
Winn, Sarah Ethel . 



Everett 

South Boston 

Manchester 

Salisbury 

Maiden 

Waverley 

Beverly Cove 

Wakefield 

Salem 

Essex 

Reading 

North Andover 

Methuen 



Commercial Department 

Senior Class 

Adams, Persis Florence . 
Badger, Marie . 
Barrett, William Francois 
Currier, Ruth Harriet 
Donovan, Alice Elizabeth 
Hiatt, Ruth Frances 
Knowlton, Elsie Olive 
Levine, Rosa 
Lind, Inez Elizabeth 
Mangan, Lucy May . 
Mansfield, Ruby Blanche 
Martin, Alice Leona 
McDonald, Beatrice Magdeline 
McGill, Frances Catherine 
O'Rourke, Charles Philip 
Phelps, Ethehnd Mary 
Reed, Lois Jane 
Rigby, Alice Nathalie 
Shields, Hazel Dean . 
de Sloovere, Teresa . 
Turner, Andreas Wesley Sproule 
Waitt, Viola .... 



Franklin 

Framingham 

Lowell 

Newburyport 

Wakefield 

Maiden 

Pigeon Cove 

Dorchester 

Maiden 

Pittsfield 

Reading 

Maiden 

Cambridge 

Pittsfield 

Peabody 

Lynn 

Everett 

Melrose 

Melrose 

Webster 

Lynn 

Maiden 



1 Was a member of the school less than three months. 



60 



Special Students in Second Year of Two-year Course 

Butler, Hazel Belle Hingham 

Lynch, Rosamond Frances Ursula . . . Danvers 



Special Students, One-year Course 



Barbour, Maude Lyda 
Lawrence, Grace Irene 
Lindsay, Amy Blaney 
Ostergren, Fred V. 1 
Robinson, Helen Mae 



Nashua, N. H. 
Leominster 
Amherst 
Dorchester 
South Boston 



Middle Year Class 
Bresee, Clarence Douglas 
Burke, Joseph Michael 
Callaghan, Margaret Agatha 
Donovan, Kathleen Elizabeth 
Elliott, Nettie Edna . 
Harris, Mar jorie Linda 1 
Holland, Katherine Elizabeth 
Horan, Mary Gertrude 
King, Georgiana . 
Lisk, Agnes Anna . 
McCarthy, Alice Rita 
Millard, Leslie Cooper 
Parks, Walter Everett 
Potter, Mae Alice . 
Ross, Gertrude Margaret 
Stanton, Sturgis Towne 
Stuart, Mae Claire 
Taggart, Gwendolyn Eva . 
Tenney, Constance Mary 
Winchester, Elizabeth Billings 



Dorchester 

Lynn 

North Easton 

Newburyport 

Stoneham 

Melrose 

Chariest own 

Hamilton 

North Attleborough 

Smiths 

Ayer 

Ipswich 

Gloucester 

Newburyport 

Salem 

Beverly 

Newton 

West Rindge, N. H. 

West Newton 

Peabody 



Special Students in First Year of Two-year Course 

Bolton, Anna Clothilde Lowell 

Bresee, David Holmes Dorchester 

Crosier, Bertha Rose Fitchburg 

Garland, John Lincoln Salem 



1 Was a member of the school less than three months. 



61 



Hebart, Helena Madeline Easthampton 

Leavitt, Arthur William Concord Junction 

Macdonald, John G. 1 Everett 

Sullivan, Mary Jane Dalton 

Wooding, Ruby Philenia . Wallingford, Conn. 



Junior Class 

Allston, Henrietta EJnowlton 
Boswell, Mae Gertrude . 
Campbell, Emily Margaret 
Cohen, Libby Julia . 
Cohn, Lillian Belle . 
Collins, Sadie Loretta 
Corner, Doris Gulash 
Decker, Harriet Frances 
Friend, Ruth Cole . 
Gill, James Albert Joseph 
Goodell, John Francis, Jr. 
Goodwin, Ruth Childs 
Hanscom, Lucy Densmore 
Harrington, Teresa Elizabeth 
Harvey, Gilman Clifton . 
Haskins, Anna Gertrude . 
Holmes, Walter D. x . 
Kenney, Berniece Bailey * 
Kent, Edith Marion l 
Killion, Mary Bernadette 
Law, Elizabeth . 
Lurie, Florence Libbie 
McGrath, Katherine Isabel 
Merrithew, Maude Evelyn 
Pendleton, Dorothy Ivalor 
Poor, Jessie Elizabeth 
Ronan, John Clifford 
Sawyer, Hortense Elizabeth 
Schein, Ethel Sarah . 
Tufts, Doris Marie . 
W'alker, Alvine Clara 



Cliftondale 

Beverly 

Charlestown 

Dorchester 

Maiden 

Pittsfield 

Lowell 

Foxborough 

Gloucester 

Charlestown 

Peabody 

Swampscott 

Wakefield 

Salem 

Annisquam 

Pittsfield 

Chelsea 

Lynn 

Essex 

Westwood 

Foxborough 

Boston 

Marblehead 

Cliftondale 

Haverhi 

Petersham 

Newburyport 

Ayer 

Chelsea 

Maiden 

Gardner 



1 Was a member of the school less than three months. 



62 



Summary 

Students of the elementary and intermediate departments . .312 

Special students, elementary department 4 

Students of the commercial department 73 

Special students, commercial department 16 

405 

Whole number of students from opening of school . . 6,657 

Whole number of graduates 3,558 

Number of certificates for special course of one or two years . 135